WPDFD Articles: July 2004 Feature

started by Magus1011 on Nov 27, 2004 — RSS Feed

Magus1011 Magus1011
Posts: 2

Hi All,

I'm fairly new to this web page creation stuff so I could use your help.

A "friend" of mine, knowing I'm pretty good at fixing computers, gave me a web page to create. She drew me a sketch of what she wanted and specified the images and fonts to be used. All I had to do was "make it happen" or, cut the code. Well, the inevitable happened and now I'm stuck.

She wants a particular font used for parts of the page, one that isn't available in the standard browsers -NevisionCasD- so I went looking. My first place to look was Microsoft where I found their WEFT tool. It's an okay solution if you are restricted to MSIE browsers, but this site is for everyone. I ran into the same problem with Netscapes font tool, so I went looking for "real" solutions.

I found a hint of such a solution in the issue of your newsletter in the subject of this message, specifically:


If you want to make sure that surfers see exactly the font you have used, to conform with a corporate image for instance, you will have to rasterize the type into a GIF or PNG file, or you could make it into a static .SWF (Flash) setting provided you don't need a transparent background.

If that's what I have to do then that's fine, but my question is: How do I rasterize the type?

Your help is much appreciated.

--
Regards,
Magus.

Joe Gillespie Joe Gillespie
Posts: 528

Just type the words into a graphics program - Photoshop, Fireworks, Paintshop Pro etc and save it in GIF or PNG format. This is an image of the type, just like the logo at the top of this page. The trouble is that search engines can't read images so that text is useless as far as Google is concerned. What you can do is to make sure that the alt part of the img tag spells out what is in the image. eg

<img src = "images/myheadline.gif" [red]alt="this is my headline"[/red] width="200" height="50">

It is not a good idea to use images for passages of text just to get a particular typeface. They should be kept to an absolute minimum.

Magus1011 Magus1011
Posts: 2

Thanks for the reply. I'll just type the words into Paint Shop Pro or The Gimp then. I had thought of typing the letters and thus taking myself back to the days of moveable type or "leads" as they were called.

Why do you want the images kept to a minimum? Just download time or is there another reason? If it's not a good idea to make the images then how _do_ I get a specific typeface on a web page in a way that's cross-browser compatiable?

--
Regards,
Magus.

Joe Gillespie Joe Gillespie
Posts: 528

Why do you want the images kept to a minimum? Just download time or is there another reason?


It's called 'accessibility'. As I said, text in images can't be read or indexed by search engines and can't be read by screen reading software for the partially sighted. It doesn't resize and it takes a lot more bandwidth than text.

If it's not a good idea to make the images then how _do_ I get a specific typeface on a web page in a way that's cross-browser compatiable?


Make a PDF. The Web is based upon HTML and the 'T' means text. It is not intended for specific typefaces, type sizes, line-breaks or all those other things that print designers take for granted. It is a different medium and has to be treated as such. Trying to use specific typefaces - which were never designed for low resolution screen display, is only going to cause frustration. Don't fight the medium!

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