Selling Your Ideas

by Joe Gillespie — Jul 1, 2003

A very touchy subject this month. It's all very well coming up with a knockout design, but at some stage, you have to sell it to the client.

Some designers like to show the client several alternative designs where others prefer to show only one and make a very good case as to why it is the 'right' one.

A lot of this comes down to experience and confidence.

Giving the client alternative designs to choose from might seem like a good way to hedge your bets. Surely they must like one of them? On the other hand, when your doctor examines you, he doesn't let you choose from a list of illnesses you might have. You wouldn't have a lot of confidence in a doctor who was unable make a definite diagnosis, or, at least, refer you to an appropriate specialist.

The designer who is able to present the single, justified solution has to be able to convince the client that this design is the best solution to his problem. This acknowledges that she understands the problem in the first place, has considered alternative solutions, dismissing those that don't come up to scratch and has been left with 'the' answer by default.

Sometimes there is one ultimate answer to a problem, sometimes there isn't.

One thing's for certain, if you can't sell your own work, what chance do you stand of selling something for somebody else?

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