WPDFD Issue #80 - November 01, 2004

This is the fourth, and final, article in the series which started in the August issue. For someone used to designing for print, dealing with Web pages can a be a frustrating and hair-pulling experience – if you let it.If, instead of fighting the medium, you work with it, and go with the flow, you will live longer and happier. 'Nuff said. Artwork/Production: Getting technical Another huge difference between print and Web design is in what you might call 'programming', although the more accurate term is 'scripting'.

Patently transparent

'Opacity', it what your graphics program probably calls 'transparency'. Is the glass half opaque or half transparent? Whichever way you look at it, if you try it on the Web, you could have problems. Opacity is not officially supported yet in CSS although it has been around for a while in proprietary, browser-specific guises. In Microsoft Internet Explorer (Windows version only), you can use: filter: alpha(opacity=<value>); This is a semi-transparent foreground image on top of some graphic type on a div background.

Buttons over images

Joe Gillespie If you want to put multiple links on an image, in a navbar or diagram for instance, the usual way to do it is with an imagemap. I hate imagemaps! Not only are they difficult to set-up and edit, they can cause accessibility and usability problems and belong in the trash can along with frames and blink tags. Where a 'normal' button can have a rollover effect that gives visual feedback, with an imagemap you are depending on a cursor change or lumbered with IE's ugly link outlines.

Campaign Monitor

In a Net awash with unsolicited junk mail and SPAM, it's getting increasingly difficult to send legitimate marketing information to people who have actually asked for it. If you do manage to get your newsletters or e-brochures through, it's hard to judge how effective it's been. There are bulk mailing programs and newsletter-sending CGI scripts but they do take considerable time and effort to set up and manage.

Buttons over images

If you want to put multiple links on an image, in a navbar or diagram for instance, the usual way to do it is with an imagemap. I hate imagemaps! Not only are they difficult to set-up and edit, they can cause accessibility and usability problems and belong in the trash can along with frames and blink tags. Where a 'normal' button can have a rollover effect that gives visual feedback, with an imagemap you are depending on a cursor change or lumbered with IE's ugly link outlines.

This is the fourth, and final, article in the series. For someone used to designing for print, dealing with Web pages can a be a frustrating and hair-pulling experience – if you let it.If, instead of fighting the medium, you work with it, and go with the flow, you will live longer and happier. 'Nuff said. Artwork/ProductionGetting technical Another huge difference between print and Web design is in what you might call 'programming', although the more accurate term is 'scripting'.

Campaign Monitor

In a Net awash with unsolicited junk mail and SPAM, it's getting increasingly difficult to send legitimate marketing information to people who have actually asked for it. If you do manage to get your newsletters or e-brochures through, it's hard to judge how effective it's been. There are bulk mailing programs and newsletter-sending CGI scripts but they do take considerable time and effort to set up and manage.

Patently transparent

'Opacity', it what your graphics program probably calls 'transparency'. Is the glass half opaque or half transparent? Whichever way you look at it, if you try it on the Web, you could have problems. Opacity is not officially supported yet in CSS although it has been around for a while in proprietary, browser-specific guises. In Microsoft Internet Explorer (Windows version only), you can use: filter: alpha(opacity=<value>); This is a semi-transparent foreground image on top of some graphic type on a div background.